When Something Isn’t Really Something

I've been thinking about this a lot lately, having run into a few examples of it personally. When people call a process “Open Space Technology” when it is not really Open Space Technology. Chris Corrigan sums it up nicely:

 

One caveat: Open Space Technology is not a proprietary process, and therefore there are no certification rules about who can use it. This is as it should be. However, this also creates the occasional problem with people calling a process “Open Space Technology” when it is not really Open Space Technology. It can be combined with other process as long as it stands alone, but it is not possible to “modify” Open Space Technology and still achieve the results one would expect to achieve in a true Open Space Technology meeting. You will get something but it won’t be Open Space Technology and you probably won’t get the results and benefits described on this site.

This is me opening space at an event where we used Open Space Technology