A Sensing Journey Story

Some reflections as I read Otto Scharmer's blog post about a sensing journey and gathering in Belitung of 30 stakeholders of the community (governmental department heads, NGOs, religious leaders, business leaders, etc).

1. I can related to the feeling when it's late, people are tired… is it possible do what we hoped with this gathering? Do we shift or move ahead? Being present and sensing what is the next right step, not holding on too tightly to your plans but also not abandoning them at the first whiff of uncertainty. Leaning into it.

2. Use of an inspirational video – in this case one about astronauts turning the camera back on planet earth. Reminds me of this Overview Effect video. Love the connection between the video and flowing into the small group dialogue with the invitation to “turn the camera back onto planet Belitung”.

3. The question of “what they notice, what is dying, what is wanting to be born”. This question has a lot of energy for me. It reminds me of Berakana's two loops, and I think is a lovely question to host in many settings. Invites us away from the unhealthy perception of limitless growth or false sense of permanence into the natural pattern of living systems.

4. The social presencing theatre with sheets of paper each labeled with one of the key stakeholders in the community. Asking to add missing stakeholder roles, and then enacting the voice, view and concerns of all stakeholders where everyone was invited to stand up and step into one of the stakeholder roles (not one's own role) and to “speak from the I”. In my work with groups we talk about inviting everyone into the room however sometimes it isn't possible due to scheduling, logistics, invitation process etc. I think this is a great way for those roles be present in the room and alive in the hearts and minds of the other bodies there, invoking the spirit of the “whole system in the room”.

Looking forward to reading more in the 2014 Theory U/ Society 4.0 Fieldbook.

Sunset Over Western South America (NASA, International Space Station, 04/12/11) [Explored]

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center via Compfight